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History of New Orleans Baseball

1850's | 1860's | 1870's | 1880's | 1890's | 1900's | 1910's | 1920's
1930's | 1940's | 1950's | 1960's | 1970's | 1980's | 1990's | 2000's
2010's

1859

• Amateur baseball leagues play their games on the grounds of the Delachaise Estate near present day Louisiana Avenue.
• The Lone Star Base Ball Club is organized.

1860

• The Comet Base Ball Club is organized.

1861-1864

• Civil War

1864

• The R.E. Lee Base Ball Club is organized.

1865

• The Pelican Base Ball Club is organized.

1867

• The Louisiana Base Ball Association is formed in New Orleans. It would continue to operate until 1873.

1869

• The New York Mutuals play a series of exhibition games against the New Orleans Pelicans during December.

1870

• N.O. Population: 197,913
• Baseball’s first spring training camp is held in New Orleans when the Chicago White Stockings come to New Orleans in May to play the touring Cincinnati Red Stockings, but end up staying for several weeks.

1871

• The National Association (1871 – 1875) is formed.

1875

• Charles Mason becomes the first New Orleans native to play in the major leagues, appearing with the Philadelphia Centennials of the National Association.

1876

• The National League (1876 - present) is formed.

1880

• N.O. Population: 222,863
• The Crescent City League is formed in New Orleans. It will continue to operate until 1884.

1882

• The American Association (1882 – 1891) is formed.

1883

• N.Y. Giants hold a Ladies’ Day event

1884

• The Union Association forms and collapses after only a few weeks of operation.
• The Southern League (1885 – 1899) is formed.
• Bill Butler, John Peltz and George Mundinger sign with the Indianapolis Hoosiers and Jimmy Woulfe signs with the Cincinnati Red Stockings, all of the American Association (AA). They are among the first New Orleanians to play professional baseball in the major leagues.
• The Boston Beaneaters hold their spring training camp in New Orleans.

1885

• Unable to secure a franchise in the new Southern League, New Orleans and Mobile each send two teams into the new Gulf Coast League.
• The New Orleans Amateur League is formed in New Orleans, but only operates for a single season.

1886

• Sportsman’s Park opens. It was located near what is now City Park Avenue and the Pontchatrain Expressway across from Greenwood Cemetery.
• New Orleanian Bill Smith plays with the Detroit Wolverines (NL).
• The New Orleans Unions play in the Southern League of Colored Baseballists (SLCB).

1887

• Tulane University’s baseball team plays a team from the Crescent Light Guards.
• New Orleans businessman Toby Hart secures a franchise for the city in the Southern League – the New Orleans Pelicans. Their first game is played on April 17th at Sportsman’s Park. Tom Brennan is the manager and Abner Powell is the team’s captain.
• Abner Powell convinces the Pelicans to make Ladies’ Day a regular part of the team’s schedule. The first in a series of regularly scheduled Ladies’ Day games is held on April 29th.
• The Pelicans capture their first pennant, compiling a record of 74 - 40. Standouts during the season include Abner Powell, Charles “Count” Campau, George McVey and Ed Cartwright.
• Abner Powell also institutes the practice of covering the infield with a modified canvas tarpaulin on rainy days.
• New Orleanian Mike Shea plays with the Cincinnati Red Stockings (AA).

1888

• The Crescent City Base Ball Park opens on February 9th.
• The first intrastate collegiate sporting event in Louisiana occurs on January 8th when the Tulane University baseball team defeats a squad from LSU in Baton Rouge.
• The Pelicans, under new manager Abner Powell, finish the 1888 season with a record of 25 - 32. Standouts during the season were John Sneed and Perry “Moose” Werden.
• Ladies’ Day adopted on a regular basis in Cincinnati.
• The Cincinnati Red Stockings hold their spring training camp in New Orleans.

1889

• New Orleanian Joe Dowie plays for the Baltimore Orioles (AA).
• Abner Powell institutes the use of a special rain check for games that have been cancelled because of rain. He also establishes the Knothole Gang, letting the neighborhood kids into the ballyard free once a week.
• The Pelicans finish the season with a record of 46 – 9 and capture their second Southern League title. Standouts during the season were Mark Polehemus and Fred Abbott.

1890

• N.O. Population: 248,712
• The Player’s League is established and folds during its first season.
• The Southern League did not operate and would not return until 1892.

1892

• The Pelicans finish tied for 2nd with a 66 – 57 record. The star of the team is Charles “Count“ Campau.

1893

• Yellow fever outbreak in New Orleans.
• The Pelicans finish in 8th place with a mark of 40 - 51.

1894

• Abner Powell is replaced by Henry Powers as manager of the Pelicans, but Powers’ team can do no better than 34 – 35, good enough for 5th place.

1895

• New Orleans Native Harry Spies signs with the Cincinnati Reds (NL).
• The New York Giants hold their spring training camp in New Orleans, while the Cincinnati Reds train in nearby Mobile, AL.
• Abner Powell is reinstated as the Pelicans manager and guides his club to a 4th place finish with a record of 46 – 55.

1896

• The Cincinnati Reds hold their spring training camp in New Orleans.
• New Orleanian Steve Toole signs with the Brooklyn Grays (AA).
• The Pelicans capture their 3rd Southern League pennant, going 67 – 30 behind standout hurler Lucien Smith.

1897

• The Cincinnati Reds hold their spring training camp in New Orleans.
• The Southern League cannot muster enough financial support and does not operate.

1898

• The Southern League struggles to operate, but eventually collapses on July 4th.
• The Pelicans close out the abbreviated season in 6th place with a record of 10 – 15.

1899

• Abner Powell introduces the idea of a detachable rain check on tickets to thwart fence jumpers and freeloaders.
• The Pelicans are in 3rd place with a 19 – 21 mark when the Southern League collapses again on May 1st. The league would close up shop permanently.

1900

• N.O. Population: 294,615
• The Cincinnati Reds hold their spring training camp in New Orleans, while the Chicago White Sox train in nearby Mobile, AL.

1901

• Athletic Park opens in New Orleans on Tulane Avenue between South Carrollton Avenue and South Pierce Street. It would be the home of the Pelicans until 1908.
• The American League is formed (1901 – present).
• Abner Powell, Charley Frank and Newt Fischer form the Southern Association from the ashes of the old Southern League. Powell will have an ownership stake in the Pelicans along with New Orleanian Isidore Newman.
• The Pelicans finish their first season in the Southern Association in 4th place with a record of 68 – 55.
• President McKinley is assassinated.

1902

• The Cleveland Indians hold their spring training camp in New Orleans.
• The Pelicans put up a record of 72 – 47, finishing in 3rd place.
• Pelicans Attendance: 98,000

1903

• The Cleveland Indians hold their spring training camp in New Orleans, while the Detroit Tiger are in Shreveport, LA.
• The Pelicans are managed at various times during the season by Count Campau, Zeke Wrigley, and Joe Rickert not can do no better than 8th place, finishing 46 – 78.
• The Wright brothers make their historic first flight at Kitty Hawk.

1904

• Abner Powell sells his interest in the New Orleans Pelicans to Charley Frank who becomes their new field manager.
• The Chicago White Sox play a series of exhibition games in New Orleans from March 20 – 27.
• On July 9th, pitcher Babe Brown tosses the first no-hitter in Pelican history against Shreveport. On September 11th, Jim Wiggs throws a no-hit game versus the Little Rock Travelers.
• The Pelicans conclude the regular season at 78 – 58 in 3rd place.

1905

• The Chicago White Sox and the Cleveland Indians hold their spring training camps in New Orleans.
• An outbreak of yellow fever results in a quarantine of New Orleans. The Pelicans are forced to play most of their games out of town, but still manage to capture their first Southern Association crown behind Jimmy Dygert and Otto Williams, finishing with a record of 84 – 45.
• Abner Powell is forced to sell his interest in the Atlanta Crackers, but promptly makes a sizable investment in the Nashville Volunteers.
• Albert Einstein publishes his Theory of Relativity.

1906

• San Francisco experiences a devastating earthquake.
• The Chicago White Sox and the Cleveland hold their spring training camps in New Orleans.
• The Philadelphia Athletics play a series of exhibition games against the Pelicans in March.
• With a record of 75 – 61, the Pelicans finish in 4th place behind the pitching of Ted Breitenstein.

1907

• The Chicago Cubs, the Chicago White Sox, and the Philadelphia all play exhibition games in New Orleans throughout the spring.
• The Pelicans are led by pitcher Mark “Moxie” Manuel and infielder Jake Atz, finishing 68 – 66 in 3rd place.

1908

• Pelican Park opens in New Orleans. It was located on South Carrollton Avenue between Banks Street and Palmyra across from present-day Jesuit High School. The ballyard would continue to be the home of the Pelicans until 1915.
• Henry Ford introduces the Model-T automobile.
• The Chicago White Sox and the Philadelphia Athletics once again visit the city during the spring to play the Pelicans in a series of exhibition games.
• The Pelicans improve to 2nd place with a mark of 68 – 66.

1909

• The Cleveland Indians play a series of exhibition games in New Orleans.
• New Orleanian Ed Lafitte signs with the Detroit Tigers (AL).
• On August 15th, Ted Breitenstein hurls a no hitter versus Montgomery, walking only four men during the game.
• The Pelicans finish in 4th place with a record of 73 – 64.
• Admiral Peary reaches the North Pole.

1910

• N.O. Population: 348,109
• While the Cleveland Indians hold spring training in Alexandria, the Chicago Cubs play a series of exhibition games in New Orleans.
• The Pelicans win their second Southern Association pennant behind the hitting of Shoeless Joe Jackson and the pitching of Pat Paige, Otto Hess, and Gordon Hickman. They finish the season with a 87 – 53 record.

1911

• The Cleveland Indians return to Alexandria, LA for spring training, but their new outfielder, Joe Jackson, travels to New Orleans to help his old teammates defeat the Chicago Cubs in a series of exhibition games in New Orleans.
• The Pelicans capture their third Southern Association title with a record of 78 – 54.

1912

• HMS Titanic sinks.
• The Chicago Cubs and the Cleveland Indians hold their spring training camps in New Orleans, while the Detroit Tigers return for spring training to Monroe, LA.
• The Pelicans compile a record of 71 – 64 and finish in 3rd place.

1913

• The Pelicans go 45 – 85 and finish last in the Southern Association, prompting the firing of manager Charley Frank.

1914

• Federal League is formed and operates for two years.
• Johnny Dobbs is named the Pelicans new manager.
• New Orleans native Larry Gilbert plays with the “miracle” Boston Braves and becomes the first New Orleanian to play in a World Series.
• The Pelicans return to the top half, finishing in 3rd place with a record of 80 – 65.
• The Panama Canal opens.
• World War I begins in Europe.

1915

• Heinemann Park opens at the corner of Tulane Avenue and South Carrollton Avenue. It will be renamed Pelican Stadium in 1938 and would remain the Pelicans home field through 1957.
• On July 7th, Pelican pitcher Buck Weaver throws a no-hitter against the Nashville Vols.
• The Pelicans win their fourth Southern Association pennant with a record of 91 – 63. Pitcher Popboy Smith is a standout.
• Pelicans Attendance: 134,405

1916

• The Cleveland Indians hold their spring training camp in New Orleans.
• New Orleanian Ted Jourdan signs with the Chicago White Sox (AL).
• On August 8th, Cotton Knaupp turns the only unassisted triple play in the history of the Southern Association during a game against the Chattanooga Lookouts.
• The Pelicans compile a record of 73 – 61 and finish in 2nd place.
• Pelicans Attendance: 111,387

1917

• World War I and the Russian Revolution
• The Cleveland Indians return to New Orleans to hold their spring training camp.
• The Pelicans finish in 2nd place with a 89 – 61 mark.
• Pelicans Attendance: 120,064

1918

• World War I
• A massive flu epidemic breaks out worldwide. During the next two years it would claim the lives of 22 million Americans.
• As more and more teams struggle, the Southern Association considers closing the season. On June 12th, manager Johnny Dobbs brings his N.O. club to the Texas League until the league suspends play on July 7th.
• The Pelicans had been in 1st place with a record of 49 – 21 until the Southern Association suspended play on June 28th.
• Pelicans Attendance: 50,484

1919

• Flu epidemic in America continues.
• The Cleveland Indians hold their spring training camp in New Orleans.
• New Orleanian Larry Gilbert is signed by Pelican president A.J. Heinemann.
• The Pelicans run up a record of 74 – 31 and finish in 3rd place.
• Pelicans Attendance: 108,358

1920

• N.O. Population: 397,915
• The Chicago Black Sox scandal hits the newspapers.
• The Dixie Series is initiated – the pennant winner from the Southern Association will play the pennant winner from the Texas League in a best-of-seven series.
• The Cleveland Indians hold their spring training camp in New Orleans.
• The N.O. Black Pelicans play in the Southern Negro League (SNL).
• The Pelicans finish in 2nd place with a record of 86 – 62. Joe Sewell and Roy Walker turn in notable performances during the season.
• Pelicans Attendance: 108,358

1921

• New Orleans plays host to three clubs for spring training: the St. Louis Browns, the Brooklyn Dodgers, and the Cleveland Indians. The New York Yankees hold their spring training camp in Shreveport, LA.
• On July 24th, Pelican pitcher Tom Philips tosses a no hitter against the Mobile Bears. It was nearly a perfect game except for a single walk issued to Mobile centerfielder Emmett Mulvey.
• The Pelicans finish in 2nd place with a record of 97 – 57. Dazzy Vance and Ike Boone are standouts.
• Pelicans Attendance: 167,076

1922

• The New York Yankees hold their spring training camp in New Orleans.
• College baseball fans take notice of Loyola University slugger Henry “Zeke” Bonura.
• Pelican pitcher Joe Martina leads the club to a 89 – 64 season which puts the Pels in 3rd place for the season.
• Pelicans Attendance: 148,825

1923

• The New York Yankees return to New Orleans for spring training camp.
• Tulane University names Bruce Hays as the school’s first full-time head baseball coach.
• Larry Gilbert is named manager of the Pelicans.
• The Pelicans win their fifth Southern Association pennant with a mark of 89 – 57. They would lose the Dixie Series against Ft. Worth (2-4).
• Pelicans Attendance: 218,295

1924

• The New York Yankees hold their spring training camp in New Orleans.
• Tulane University names Claude Simons, Sr. head baseball coach.
• The Pelicans wind up in 3rd place after a 93 – 60 season.
• Pelicans Attendance: 178,529

1925

• The Boston Red Sox hold their spring training camp in New Orleans, while the Chicago White Sox train in Shreveport, LA.
• The Pelicans finish in 2nd place with a 85 – 68 slate.
• Pelicans Attendance: 223,577

1926

• The Boston Red Sox hold their spring training camp in New Orleans, while the Chicago White Sox train in Shreveport, LA.
• Gretna native MEL OTT is signed to play with the New York Giants.
• The Pelicans capture the club’s sixth Southern Association crown with a 101 – 53 record, but will lose to Dallas in the Dixie Series (2-4).
• Pelicans Attendance: 236,681

1927

• Charles Lindbergh’s non-stop flight across the Atlantic to Paris.
• The Boston Red Sox hold their spring training camp in New Orleans, while the Chicago White Sox train in Shreveport, LA.
• The 96 – 57 Pelicans win their seventh Southern Association title, but lose to Wichita Falls in the Dixie Series (0-4). A single game record crowd of 63,625 watch first game of series.
• Pelicans Attendance: 266,905

1928

• The Cleveland Indians hold their spring training camp in New Orleans, while the Chicago White Sox continue to train in Shreveport, LA.
• College baseball features two standouts: Carl Lind at Tulane and Clem Sehrt at Loyola.
• The Pelicans finish in 3rd place with a 73 – 75 record. They are led by pitcher Dave Danforth.
• Pelicans Attendance: 176,016

1929

• The Cleveland Indians hold their spring training camp in New Orleans.
• Local favorite Henry “Zeke” Bonura leads the Pelicans to a 3rd place finish with a 89 – 64 record.
• Pelicans Attendance: 194,803
• The stock market crashes in October.

1930

• N.O. Population: 493,669
• The first supermarket opens in the United States.
• In January, Pelican owner A.J. Heinemann commits suicide. Cleveland Indians’ owner Charles Somers purchases the remaining shares from Heinemann’s estate.
• The Cleveland Indians play a series of exhibition games in New Orleans, announcing that the Pelicans have officially become an Indians farm club (1930-1939).
• On August 5th the Pelicans play their first night game in Little Rock, losing to the Travelers by a score of 12 – 7.
• The Pelicans would finish in 2nd place with a record of 91 – 61.
• Pelicans Attendance: 175,239

1931

• The Empire State Building in New York becomes the tallest building in the world.
• The Cleveland Indians hold their spring training camp in New Orleans.
• The Pelicans finish in 5th place with a record of 78 – 75, despite standout performances from slugger Zeke Bonura and hurler Fred Johnson.
• Pelicans Attendance: 134,579

1932

• Jake Atz replaces Larry Gilbert as field manager. Gilbert moves into the front office as the club’s general manager.
• The Pelicans struggle to finish in 6th place, compiling a 66 – 84 record.
• Pelicans Attendance: 112,155

1933

• Larry Gilbert returns as the Pelican’s manager.
• Franklin Roosevelt is elected president. Prohibition is repealed.
• New Orleanian John Oulliber is signed to play with the Cleveland Indians.
• On August 18th, the Pelican’s Fred Johnson throws a no-hitter against the Birmingham Barons, allowing only two Barons to reach base – one on a walk and the other on an error by catcher Chick Autry.
• The Pelicans go 88 – 65 and take their eighth Southern Association pennant. They would defeat San Antonio in the Dixie Series (4-2).
• Pelicans Attendance: 116,604

1934

• New Orleans native Bill “Lefty” Perrin is signed to play with the Cleveland Indians.
• The Pelicans win their ninth and final Southern Association title with a record of 94 – 60, going on to defeat Galveston in the Dixie Series (4-2). Pitcher Denny Galehouse is a standout during the season.
• Pelicans Attendance: 92,423

1935

• The Cleveland Indians return to New Orleans to hold their spring training camp.
• The Pelicans finish in 2nd place behind the pitching of Al Milnar. They would compile a record of 86 – 60.
• In December, the Southern Association is elevated to Class A1.

1936

• Iowa high school ace Bob Feller is “warehoused” with the Pelicans during his senior year. Although he was under contract, he never even went to Heinemann Park. After graduation he would be released by the Pelicans and immediately signed by the Cleveland Indians.
• On May 15th the Pelicans play their first night game in Heinemann Park, losing to the Atlanta Crackers.
• The Pelicans finish in 4th place with a record of 81 – 71. Outfielder Tom Henrich has a standout season.
• Pelicans Attendance: 135,890
• Jesuit High School wins the state championship. Coach Gernon Brown’s team is led by Connie Ryan, Charlie Gilbert, John Dantonio, Billy Hodges, and Jesse Danna.

1937

• Loyola University names Jim McCafferty as their head coach for men’s baseball.
• On July 30th, Pelican pitcher John Humphries hurls a no-hitter against Chattanooga.
• The Pelicans cap an 81 – 71 season, finishing in 4th place. Eddie Rose and Larry Bettancourt are standouts during the campaign.
• Pelicans Attendance: 119,809

1938

• Claude “Monk” Simons is named head coach at Tulane.
• The New York Giants hold their spring training camp in Baton Rouge, LA.
• New Orleans native Nino Bongiovanni signs with the Cincinnati Reds.
• Heinemann Park is renamed Pelican Stadium.
• The Pelicans finish in 3rd place with a 79 – 70 mark.
• Pelicans Attendance: 142,153
• In a surprise move, Larry Gilbert resigns a the Pelican’s manager to become manager and part-owner in Nashville.

1939

• The New York Giants hold their spring training camp in Baton Rouge, LA.
• New Orleanian Jack Kramer signs to play for the St. Louis Browns (AL).
• Roger Peckinpaugh is named Pelicans' manager.
• The Pelicans finish in last place with a dismal record of 57 – 93.
• Pelicans Attendance: 92,551

1940

• N.O. Population: 538,478
• New Orleans favorite Charlie Gilbert, son of former Pelican’s manager Larry Gilbert, signs to play with the Brooklyn Dodgers (NL).
• Hal Anderson is named Pelicans' manager.
• The Pelicans become a St. Louis Cardinals farm club (1940-1942)
• A 71 – 80 record leaves the Pelicans in 5th place for the season.
• Pelicans Attendance: 68,326

1941

• Ray Blades is named Pelicans' manager.
• New Orleanian Howie Pollett signs to play with the St. Louis Cardinals (NL).
• The Pelicans improve to 78 – 75 and finish in 3rd place.
• Pelicans Attendance: 69,665
• The New Orleans/St. Louis Stars play in the Negro American League (NAL).
• On December 7th the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor draws the United States into World War II.

1942

• Pat Ankenman is named the Pelicans' manager.
• New Orleans native Connie Ryan is signed to play with the New York Giants.
• The Pelicans finish in 4th place, compiling a 77 – 73 mark.
• Pelicans Attendance: 110,401

1943

• The Pelicans become a Brooklyn Dodger farm club (1943-1944)
• Ray Blades returns as the Pelican’s manager.
• New Orleanian Lou Klein is signed by the St. Louis Cardinals (NL).
• On June 10th, Pelican hurler Bob Williams throws a no-hitter against Chattanooga.
• The Pelicans climb to 2nd place with a 78 – 58 record.
• Pelicans Attendance: 101,600

1944

• Fresco Thompson is named the Pelicans' manager.
• Local favorites Al Jurisich and Ralph “Putsy” Caballero sign with the St. Louis Cardinals (NL) and the Philadelphia Blue Jays (NL) respectively. Caballero is only 16 years old and becomes the 2nd youngest man ever to play major league baseball.
• The Pelicans finish tied for 7th place with a record of 57 – 83 despite a standout season from New Orleans native John “Fats” Dantonio.
• Pelicans Attendance: 102,267

1945

• Tulane is led by slugger Bobby Brown, who would go on to a successful career with the New York Yankees and would become president of the American League.
• The Pelicans finish in 4th place with a record of 73 – 67.
• Pelicans Attendance: 142,444
• The N.O. Black Pelicans play in the Negro Southern League (NSL).
• The first atomic bomb is dropped on Hiroshima, Japan, and brings about the end of World War II.

1946

• The Pelicans become a Boston Red Sox farm club (1946-1947)
• John Peacock is named the Pelicans' manager.
• The Pelicans put up a record of 75 – 77, good enough for 4th place.
• Pelicans Attendance: 329,071
• Mel Ott retires from major league baseball.
• Jesuit High School defeats St. Aloysius to win the state championship. The team is led by Harold "Tookie" Gilbert, Tom Wedig, Pete Tusa, Stan McDermott, Hugh Oser, and Monroe "Money" Caballero. Also of note are Pat Roney, Gus Riordan, Jack Gordon and Don Wetzel. Of the 14 players selected to the All-Prep team, 10 were from Jesuit.
• The Southern Association is raised to Class AA.

1947

• Tulane names Ben Abadie as head baseball coach.
• The Loyola Wolfpack is led by Weldon “Pappy” Cousins.
• Fred Walters is named the Pelicans' manager.
• New Orleans native Mel Parnell signs to play with the Boston Red Sox (AL).
• Jackie Robinson becomes the first black professional baseball player in the modern era to play in the major leagues.
• The Pelicans enjoy the post-war boom with a 93 – 59 season, finishing in 2nd place. Standouts are Al Kozar, Al Flair, and Ed Lavigne.
• Pelicans Attendance: 400,036.

1948

• Local businessmen led by A.B. Freeman sell the Pelicans to the Pittsburgh Pirates organization. The Pelicans become a Pirates farm club (1948-1956).
• Jimmy Brown is named the Pelicans' manager.
• The Pelicans finish in 5th place with a record of 70 – 83.
• Pelicans Attendance: 234,772
• New Orleans native Hal Bevan is signed by the Pittsburgh Pirates (NL) as an amateur free agent.

1949

• Hugh Luby is named the Pelicans' manager.
• The Pelicans finish 77 – 75 in 4th place.
• Pelicans Attendance: 248,772
• NORD baseball is featured in a September issue of LIFE Magazine.

1950

• The Korean War breaks out.
• Hugh Luby is replaced in mid-season by Bill Burwell as the Pelicans' manager.
• Hal Bevan joins the New Orleans Pelicans.
• Pelicans Attendance: 203,445

1951

• The first color television in the United States appears.
• Rip Sewell is named the Pelicans' manager.
• The Pelicans finish in 7th place with a 64 – 90 record.
• Pelicans Attendance: 127,304
• Waren Easton wins the state high school championship, led by Al Seeger, Mickey LaCaost, Jules Ursin, and Warren Bourgeois.

1952

• Loyola’s baseball club is led by Tony Chimento and Maurice “Moon” Landrieu, who is named All Gulf States Conference.
• Danny Murtaugh is named the Pelicans' manager.
• The Pelicans end the season in 5th place with a 80 – 75 record.
• Pelicans Attendance: 232,043
• The New Orleans Eagles play in the Negro American League (NAL).
• New Orleanians Al Seeger and Warren Bourgeois sign professional baseball contracts. Seeger signs with the Chicago Cubs (NL) and Bourgeois with the Boston Red Sox (AL).

1953

• New Orleans native Tony Roig is signed to play with the Washington Senators (AL).
• The Pelicans finish in 5th place with a record of 76 – 78.
• Pelicans Attendance: 123,905
• On August 7th, baseball pioneer and innovator Abner Powell dies in New Orleans.

1954

• The Pelicans enjoy their last good season, finishing in 2nd place with a record of 92 – 62. Standouts include the Freese brothers, Gene and George, and pitcher Elroy Face.
• Pelicans Attendance: 206,305

1955

• Tulane names former player Ben Abadie as head baseball coach.
• Marion “Dooky” Dauphin leads the Loyola Wolfpack.
• Andy Cohen is named the Pelicans' manager.
• The Pelicans finish in 6th place with a 76 – 75 slate, despite a standout season for Danny Kravitz.
• Pelicans Attendance: 128,993

1956

• The Pelicans finish in 6th place behind a 79 – 75 record.
• Pelican Attendance: 96,753
• Mel Parnell and Howie Pollet retire from major league baseball.

1957

• Loyola names Louis “Rags” Scheuermann as head baseball coach. His standout player this season will be Butler Powell.
• The Pelicans become a New York Yankee farm club (1957 – 1958).
• The Pelicans name Harry “Peanuts” Lowrey as their manager.
• 19-year old New Orleanian Dave Hill is signed to play with the Kansas City Athletics (AL).
• On September 1st the final game in Pelican Stadium is played. The facility is demolished to make way for a motel.
• Pelicans Attendance: 67,287

1958

• New Orleans natives Earl Robinson and Al Schroll sign to play with the Los Angeles Dodgers (NL) and the Boston Red Sox (AL) respectively.
• The Pelicans arrange a two-year lease at City Park Stadium (now Tad Gormley).
• Charlie Silvera is named the Pelicans manager. He is replaced in mid-season by New Orleans native Ray Yochim.
• The Pelicans finish in last place with a 57 – 94 record. A campaign is started to try to revive interest in the failing franchise.
• Pelicans Attendance: 50,369
• On November 29th Mel Ott dies from injuries received in an automobile accident.

1959

• Former Red Sox pitcher and native son Mel Parnell is named the Pelicans manager.
• On June 26th, Pelicans' pitcher Don Kildoo throws what will be the final no-hitter in the club’s history against the Birmingham Barons.
• The Pelicans finish in 6th place with a record of 68 – 81.
• Pelicans Attendance: 71,577
• DeLaSalle High School wins the state championship. Coach John Altobello’s team is led by John Morreale, Lloyd Fourroux, Wayne Pietri, and Allan Montreuil. Also of note were Bobby Neider, Pete Vollenweider, A.J. Krail, Frank Melito, Lenny Betzer, and Merrill Vitter.

1960

• The Pelican franchise sold to Little Rock. New Orleans becomes the largest city in America without professional baseball.

1961

• Loyola’s baseball squad is led by Wayne Pietri.
• The Southern Association folds.
• Jesuit High School wins the state championship under Coach Kevin Trower. Standouts on the team include Rusty Staub, Pat Screen, Harry Morel, Taylor Walet, and Charlie Grey. Also of note were Henry Winters, Richie Hammel, Billy Bassett, and John Stephens.

1963

• Tom Schwaner turns in a standout season for Loyola.
• New Orleans native Rusty Staub signs with the Houston Colt 45s (NL).
• On November 22nd President Kennedy is assassinated.

1964

• Allan Montreuil is signed by the Boston Red Sox (AL) as an amateur free agent.

1965

• The Vietnam War begins (1965 – 1973).
• Tulane pitcher John Olagues is named All-SEC and an Honorable Mention All-American.

1966

• Former Pelican Gene Freese retires from baseball.
• Jesuit’s Wayne Francingues is drafted by the Baltimore Orioles (AL) while teammate Fabian Mang is drafted by the Atlanta Braves (NL).

1967

• Tulane names Milt Retif as their head baseball coach.

1968

• Gary Bono sparks the Loyola nine with a stellar season.
• Infielder Andrew Williams of Jesuit is drafted by the Houston Astros (NL).

1970

• Loyola is led by Wally Pontiff, Sr.

1971

• Coach Joe Brockhoff’s East Jefferson squad wins the state high school championship, led by Mike Lavin, Mike Miley, and David Seay. Also of note were Mike Mulligan and John LeBlanc.

1972

• The University of New Orleans (UNO) names Ron Maestri as their head coach.
• New Orleanian Allan Montreuil makes his major league debut with the Chicago Cubs (NL).

1974

• Tulane names Joe Brockhoff as their head coach.
• UNO goes to the Division II College World Series.
• On August 8th, former major-league All-Star Howie Pollett dies.
• Rummel, under Coach Larry Schneider, wins the state high school championship behind the play of Rickey Zibilich, Dom Giambrone, Jim Kropog, Matt Bullinger, and Kenny Francingues.
• Mike Miley signs with the Cincinnati Reds (NL) organization.

1976

• Former Jesuit and Tulane standout Jim Gaudet is drafted by the Kansas City Royals (NL).
• UNO goes to the Division II College World Series.

1977

• Sportsman A. Ray Smith revives the New Orleans Pelicans to play in the American Association as a St. Louis Cardinals AAA farm club. Their manager is Lance Nichols.
• The new Pelicans do not fare any better than their predecessors, finishing in last place with a 57 – 79 record.
• Pelicans Attendance: 217,957
• New Orleans native Ron Washington signs with the Los Angeles Dodgers (NL), while Gary Grey signs with the Texas Rangers (AL).
• DeLaSalle captures the state baseball championship under Coach Jerry Burrage. Standout players include Frank Wills, Bruce O’Krepki, and David Moreau.

1978

• Tulane pitcher Steve Mura signs with the San Diego Padres (NL) while Jim Gaudet signs with the Kansas City Royals (AL).

1979

• Tulane wins their first Metro Conference championship behind standout Ken Francingues.
• Jesuit High School wins the state championship. The team is led by Jim Berrigan, Brian Trosclair, and Rob Caire. Also of note were Greg Barrios, John Faciane, Steve Riley, Dickie Wentz, and Brian Shearman.

1980

• Tulane Stadium demolished.
• Jesuit High School repeats as state champion under Coach Frank Misuraca. Team leaders include Will Clark, Greg Barrios, Steve Riley, Casey Snyder, Dickie Wentz, Brian Shearman, and John Faciane.

1982

• UNO’s Augie Schmidt wins the Golden Spikes Award as the best collegiate baseball player in the country.

• John Curtis captures the Class AAAA state championship.

1983

• New Orleans native Frank Wills signs with the Kansas City Royals (AL).

1984

• UNO becomes the first local college team to go to the College World Series in Omaha.
• Brother Martin High School wins the state baseball championship under Coach Barry Hebert. The team is led by future Tulane Green Wave standout Tookie Spann, Keith Schmidt, Jeff Schwaner, Brian Muller, and Chito Martinez.

1985

• Local favorite Rusty Staub retires from baseball.
• Former Jesuit and Mississippi State alum Will Clark is drafted by the San Francisco Giants (NL).

1986

• Tulane is led by slugger Dan Wagner.
• New Orleanian Will Clark signs with the San Francisco Giants (NL).

1988

• Tookie Spann sparks the Tulane Green Wave.
• UNO’s Joe Slusarski and Ted Wood are named to the US Olympic team.

1989

• Loyola is led by Greg Suire.

1990

• East St. John wins the Class AAAAA state championship behind the play of Leroy Williams, Darrel Nicholas, and Courtney Mitchell.
• John Curtis wins the Class AAAA state championship.

1991

• Tulane University opens Turchin Field.
• John Curtis repeats as Class AAAA state champions.

1992

• Tulane wins the Metro Conference championship.
• New Orleanian Jim Bullinger signs with the Chicago Cubs (NL), while Gerald Williams signs with the New York Yankees (AL).

1993

• New Orleans once again has professional baseball when the AAA Denver Zephyrs, a Milwaukee Brewers farm club, relocate to the city. They will play at UNO’s Privateer Park (1993 – 1996).
• The Zephyrs will finish in 2nd place in the Pacific Coast League with a record of 80 – 64.
• Zephyrs Attendance: 161,846

1994

• Tulane names Rick Jones as their head baseball coach.
• Behind standouts Jeff Cirillo, Mike Matheny, and Marshall Boze, the Zephyrs finish in 3rd place with a 78 – 66 record.
• Zephyrs Attendance: 187,026

1995

• The Z’s finish in 7th place with a 63 – 79 mark.
• Zephyrs Attendance: 159,007

1996

• Tulane wins the Conference USA (CUSA) title and tournament.
• Tim Ireland is named manager of the Zephyrs.
• The Zephyrs compile a 74 – 70 and finish in 4th place.
• Zephyrs Attendance: 180,023
• Brother Martin High School wins the state baseball championship led by future LSU Tiger Blair Barbier.

1997

• Tulane wins their second CUSA title and tournament.
• Zephyr Stadium opens (1997 – present).
• The New Orleans Zephyrs become a Houston Astros farm team, remaining in the Pacific Coast League (PCL).
• Steve Swisher is named the Zephyr’s manager.
• Pitcher Roy Oswalt and infielder Carlos Guillen lead the Z’s to a 74 – 70 season, finishing in 2nd place in the PCL.
• Zephyrs Attendance: 517,200
• Archbishop Rummel captures the Class AAAAA state championship.
• John Curtis wins the Class AAAA state championship.
• Pope John Paul II wins the Class AA state championship.

1998

• New Orleans native Kirk Bullinger signs with the Montreal Expos (NL).
• Tulane wins their third straight CUSA title behind slugger Chad Sutter.
• The Zephyrs name John Tamargo as their manager.
• With a record of 76 – 66, the Zephyrs win their first PCL title and would go on to capture their first AAA World Series.
• Zephyrs Attendance: 519,584
• Salmen is Class AAAAA runner-up, while Archbishop Hannan is the Class AAAA runner-up
• Pope John Paul II wins the Class AA state championship.

1999

• Tony Pena is named Zephyrs manager.
• The Zephyrs finish in 4th place with a record of 53 – 85 despite a standout season by Lance Berkman.
• Zephyrs Attendance: 498,221
• St. Paul ’s captures the Class AAAA state championship.

2000

• The Z’s finish in 3rd place with a 68 – 24 slate.
• Zephyrs Attendance: 447,475
• Archbishop Rummel is runner-up in the Class AAAAA state championship.
• John Curtis wins the Class AAAA state championship.
• Newman wins the Class AA state championship under Coach Billy Fitzgerald.
• New Orleans favorite Will Clark retires from baseball.

2001

• On April 25th, President Bush greets UNO team at Zephyr Stadium.
• Tulane wins the CUSA tournament and conference title. Andy Canizzaro and Jake Gautreau lead the Tulane Green Wave to the College World Series.
• The Zephyrs win their second PCL title with an 82 – 57 season. Post-season play is cancelled after the attacks of September 11th.
• 82 – 57 (.590) 1st Place (T)
• Zephyrs Attendance: 385,447

2002

• Chris Maloney is named the Zephyrs manager.
• The Z’s capture 2nd place with a record of 75 – 69.
• Zephyrs Attendance: 410,183
• On April 10th, an NCAA record crowd gathers at the Superdome to watch Tulane play rival LSU. Over 27,673 fans are on hand as LSU defeats Tulane 9 – 5.

• Jesuit captures the Class AAAAA state championship under Coach David Moreau.

• John Curtis wins the Class AAAA state championship.
• On July 24th, New Orleans native and LSU standout Wally Pontiff is found dead at his home.

2003

• The New Orleans Zephyrs finish the season with a 71 - 73 record.
• Zephyr's Attendance: 379,819
• Newman wins the Class AA state championship.
• Country Day wins the Class A state championship under Coach Steve Victory.

2004

• In July, UNO replaces Randy Bush as head coach, naming Tom Walter from George Washington University in Washington, D.C. to the post.
• Also in July, Loyola University names Michael "Doc" Beeman as head baseball coach and assistant athletic director. Beeman had been the recruiting coordinator and pitching coach for Georgetown University in Washington, D.C.
• The New Orleans Zephyrs compiled a 66 - 78 record for the season (.458 winning percentage), good enough for a 3rd place finish in the PCL.
• Zephyrs' Attendance: 324,324 -- averaging 4,769 per game.
• In September, the Zephyrs and the Houston Astros ended their affiliation, but the Z's shortly thereafter signed a two-year contract with the Montreal Expos. The Expos will be moving to Washington, D.C. for the 2005 season.

2005

• The Zephyrs name Tim Foli as their manager.
• Jesuit High School wins the state baseball championship under Coach David Moreau. The team is led by Barry Butera, Jr., Jerad Commarda, Joey Hron, Matthew Dozier, Brian Seay, Anthony Scelfo, and John Faciane, Jr.
• Tulane University captures the CUSA title.

2006

• The Zephyrs finish the season at 72 – 71 (.503) under 2nd year manager Tim Foli.
• Zephyrs Attendance: 361,493 (up for the third consecutive year)
• Tulane goes 43 – 21 (.672) overall and 15 – 9 (.625) in CUSA play.
• UNO finishes 12 – 12 (.500) in the Sun Belt Conference and 30 – 28 (.517) overall.
• Loyola was 11 – 21 (.344) in conference and 20 – 32 (.384) overall.
• In December, the Zephyrs announce their association with the New York Mets, naming Ken Oberkfell as the 8th manager in team history. This marks the 4th team affiliation since 1993 – the Milwaukee Brewers (1993 – 1996), the Houston Astros (1997 – 2004), the Washington Nationals (2005 – 2006).

2007

• The New Orleans Zephyrs finish 75 – 69 (.521) under manager Ken Oberkfell and are Pacific Coast League American Conference champions. Attendance: 368,210 (fourth consecutive increase in attendance)
• The Tulane Green Wave finish 9 – 15 (.375) in Conference USA play and 34 – 26 (.567) overall. After two seasons “on the road” at Zephyr Field due to Hurricane Katrina, the Wave look forward to returning to Turchin Field in 2008.
• UNO finishes 16 – 14 (.533) in the Sun Belt Conference and 38 – 26 (.594) overall. They capture the Sun Belt Conference tournament and move into post-season play.
• Loyola was 9 – 21 (.300) in conference and 18 – 39 (.315) overall.
• Jesuit High School captures its 6th state baseball title by defeating West Monroe 4 – 2 in the championship game.

2008

• The Zephyrs finish third in PCL American South with a record of 66-75 (.468) 8.5 games behind. Marty Scott replaces Ken Oberkfell in mid-season when Oberkfell is called to the New York Mets in a management shakeup. Attendance: 349,500
• On September 20, the New Orleans Zephyrs become a AAA affiliate of the National League Florida Marlins in 2009. Edwin Rodriguez is named the 11th manager in franchise history, his 6th in the Marlins organization.
• Tulane launches its inaugural season in their newly renovated Greer Field at Turchin Stadium after a $10.5 million facelift, including increased seating capacity (5,000), an all new FieldTurf artificial playing surface and four luxury suites. They finish the season 39 – 22 – 1 (.639) overall and 13 – 9 – 1 (.591) in CUSA play.
• UNO posts a 43 – 21 (.672) record, 18 – 11 (.621) in the Sunbelt Conference.
• Loyola finishes 18 – 33 (.353) overall and 10 – 24 (.294) in Gulf Coast Athletic Conference action.

2009

• The Zephyrs post a 63 – 80 (.441) record for another third place finish in the PCL. Attendance: 362,771.
• The Tulane Green Wave close out the season 34 – 25 (.576) overall and 13 – 11 (.542) in Conference USA.
• UNO closes out the season 22 – 33 (.400) with a 12 – 18 (.400) mark in conference competition. Coach Tom Walters leaves the program to accept the head coaching position at Wake Forest.
• Loyola winds up 12 – 39 (.235), 8 – 27 (.228) in conference play.
• Jesuit High School compiles a record of 19 – 12 – 1 (.613) and captures another District 10AAA crown.

2010

• Hitting Coach Greg Norton replaces Edwin Rodriguez as the Zephyrs' manager, but they finish in third place in the PCL for the third straight year, with a record of 66 – 77 (.462). Attendance: 380,538.
• Tulane winds up 32 – 24 (.571) overall and 10 – 14 (.416) in Conference USA.
• UNO struggles with a 13 – 39 (.250) season, going 2 – 26 (.071) in conference play.
• The Loyola Wolfpack put up a record of 19 – 30 (.387), 12 – 23 (.342) in conference, for first year Head Coach Gee Cassard.

2011

• The Zephyrs coast to another third place finish with a record of 69 – 74 (.483) before a season total of 372,017 fans. In December the club names Ron Hassey as the 14th manager in team history.
• Tulane Head Coach Rick Jones gets his 1,000th career victory during a 31 – 26 (.544) season, with a 10 – 14 (.416) conference record.
• UNO's struggles continue with a 4 – 50 (.074) season.
• Loyola finishes the season 15 – 36 (.294), going 5 – 13 (.278) in conference play.
• High school state championships were won by:

  • 5A: Jesuit
  • 4A: St. Louis Catholic
  • 3A: Livonia
  • 2A: Evangel Christian
  • 1A: St. Mary

2012

• The Zephyrs wind up the season with a 73 – 67 (.521) mark and another third place finish. Attendance: 329,942.
• Tulane finishes 38 – 20 (.655) overall and 14 – 10 (.583) for a third place finish in Conference USA.
• UNO suffers through another disappointing season with a 17 – 27 (.386) overall record and a 7 – 17 (.292) record in conference play.
• Loyola ends their season at 18 – 33 (.353) overall and 3 – 27 (.100) in conference play.
• High school state championships were won by:

  • 5A: Barbe
  • 4A: Teurlings Catholic
  • 3A: North DeSoto
  • 2A: Calvary Baptist
  • 1A: Ouchita Christian

2013

• The New Orleans Zephyrs cap the season with a 72 – 72 (.500) record, finishing in fourth place. Attendance: 344,998.
• Tulane ends a disappointing season at 30 – 28 (.517) overall and 11 – 13 (.478) for a 6th place finish in Conference USA.
• UNO struggles continue through a 7 – 44 (.137) season. However, in July the university announces the return of Ron Maestri as the head coach for men’s baseball.
• Loyola posts a 16 – 39 (.291) record overall and 8 – 22 (.267) record in conference play.
• High school state championships were won by:

  • 5A: Catholic High
  • 4A: Lutcher
  • 3A: Parkview Baptist
  • 2A: Evangel Christian
  • 1A: Mangham

2014

• The Zephyrs name Andy Haines as the 15th manager in franchise history. A seven-year veteran in the Miami Marlins organization, Haines comes to New Orleans from the Class A Jupiter Hammerheads.